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The MET's Rodenticide Use


Palemale eating a rat near the MET.


Bell Labs Product information

The MET's true colors shows up in this recent incident... Two-year-old Christopher Suarez is a happy little boy, who loves playing ball. Suarez is autistic, a condition, his mother, Veronica Jackson, says was sadly misunderstood on a recent trip to The Metropolitan Museum of Art.Read more...

"The Met is worried about their "insensitive to the environment image" caused by them contracting the use a chemical that threatens the food chain including the Red-tailed Hawks and Screech Owls . This case is a small, but an important step in decreasing the toxic threat of rodenticides to birds such as Pale Male and Lola. Bromethalin is a little studied and difficult to diagnose toxic without readily available accurate and precise means of analysis available to pathologists and veterinarians. Therefore, the recognition of the importance of Bromethalin as a wildlife mortality factor will be slow."
[Dr. Ward Stone]


Stop these selfish, self-centered, stubborn and phony human beings who run the MET from jeopardizing the precious lives of the only innocent ones who are doing something right...

The Metropolitan Museum of Art
Philippe de Montebello (Director)
(212) 570-3902
email: philippe.demontebello@metmuseum.org



The Metropolitan Museum of Art
Emily Rafferty (President)
(212) 570-3900

email: emily.rafferty@metmuseum.org



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This is the recent stock response from the MET to people who are writing about the museum's lethal and careless rodenticide use:


I spoke to Mr Holzer on the phone on Friday. He claims that the protection of the museum's works of art take priority over anything else including the welfare of wildlife in the park. I told him since the museum is so concerned for the protection of its art collection why did they choose to put a restaurant in the middle of it since restaurants are a sure way to attract rodents. I then questioned his priority...If the museum is so concerned for its art why not remove the restaurant and keep food out of that building.
Mr Holzer then hastened the conversation to an end which I obliged him without unnecessary and useless salutations.


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From: Holzer, Harold
Subject: Metropolitan Museum Communication
To: "Harold Holzer (Holzer, Harold)"
Date: Friday, August 1, 2008, 9:49 AM


We are in receipt of your recent email to our executives on the subject of the Museum’s essential pest-control efforts, which as the institution has explained in its statements—I attach the most recent one—is absoluitely crucial to the protection of the staff and visitors, but also to ensure the safety of the collection of two million works of art for which we are the responsible stewards. I am sure you know that these works cover five millennia of human artistic achievement at the highest levels of creativity, and that they are the means of educating and enlightening our own and future generations about the many cultures represented here. As a practical matter, much of the collection is in storage, and any rodent infestation poses a severe danger to works on canvas, paper, or made of textile, wood, or other organic material. Such damage would be irreversible It is our irrevocable responsibility to safeguard the works for all future time.


That said, we are cognizant of and sympathetic to the concerns of environmentalists who care deeply about the natural order, and we acted immediately when alerted that unusually virulent chemicals were being employed by a contractor to bait rodent traps outside the perimeter of our building. The chemicals were changed to the same formulas used in rodent traps throughout the city’s parks, and widely recognized by experts as posing little damage to predators of rats because the material is slow-acting: by the time it kills the rodent, the chemicals have sufficiently dissipated so as to pose no threat to those who feed on it.


Please be assured that we continue to monitor these baiting stations and closely observe the situation. We are pledged to working as sensitively as possible to balance our responsibilities to the millions of people who work and visit the Met, together with the works of art they care for or come to see, as well as the beautiful park we have been privileged to occupy for more than a century.


Many thanks for your continued interest.


Harold Holzer
Senior Vice President, External Affairs
The Metropolitan Museum of Art
1000 Fifth Avenue
New York, NY 10028


T: 212-570-3951
F: 212-472-2764
Email: harold.holzer@metmuseum.org


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Common active ingredients in rodenticides


Warfarin
In first generation rodenticides. Highly hazardous, Children, birds and non-target animals, particularly dogs, cats, pigs, are at risk of poisoning. Scavengers and rodent predators are at risk of secondary poisoning from dead rodent bodies that have not been collected or have been disposed of in refuse bins or rubbish tips.


Brodifacoum
Found in the rodenticides Havoc® and Hawkrat®. It is particularly damaging to the environment because it remains active in the body for a long period of time. In studies rats have been shown to retain 34% of the single dose in their livers after 13 weeks and 11% of the active ingredient after 104 weeks. Poisons with this active ingredient are particularly dangerous for birds of prey such as hawks, eagles and owls, which may eat several rodents each day. This agent can also cause poisoning of water sources and food.


Bromadiolone Found in Maki® and Contrac® rodenticides. This is an extremely hazardous anti-coagulant. It is toxic and remains in the body of animals and can lead to secondary poisoning of predators and animals, especially pets, poultry and pigs.


Coumatetralyl Found in the rodenticide Racumin® used widely in East Aegean islands . Highly hazardous it inhibits blood coagulation and if rodents are exposed to coumatetralyl only once then they may survive, becoming a source of secondary poisoning, more doses lead to serious internal bleeding and death. It is metabolized relatively rapidly but even so it has been observed to cause secondary poisoning of predators, pets. This poison can also harm humans because animals may disperse the powder around inhabited areas There is also a risk of food, water and animal feed becoming contaminated.


Diphacinone
Found in the rodenticide Ditrac®. Studies in North America have shown that eagles and owls that ate poisoned animals showed signs of haemorrhaging and a study in New Zealand showed that stoats had a 71% mortality rate when fed with rodents poisoned by diphacinone.


Flocoumafen
Found in the rodenticide Storm®. This poison is particularly dangerous because it is extremely persistent in the liver of poisoned animals, its potential effect of the environment it is similar to that of brodifacoum.


http://www.wildcarebayarea.org/site/PageServer?pagename=TakeAction_Rodenticide

This is the recent stock response from the MET to people who are writing about the museum's lethal and careless rodenticide use:


I spoke to Mr Holzer on the phone on Friday. He claims that the protection of the museum's works of art take priority over anything else including the welfare of wildlife in the park. I told him since the museum is so concerned for the protection of its art collection why did they choose to put a restaurant in the middle of it since restaurants are a sure way to attract rodents. I then questioned his priority...If the museum is so concerned for its art why not remove the restaurant and keep food out of that building.
Mr Holzer then hastened the conversation to an end which I obliged him without unnecessary and useless salutations.


******************************************************


From: Holzer, Harold
Subject: Metropolitan Museum Communication
To: "Harold Holzer (Holzer, Harold)"
Date: Friday, August 1, 2008, 9:49 AM


We are in receipt of your recent email to our executives on the subject of the Museum’s essential pest-control efforts, which as the institution has explained in its statements—I attach the most recent one—is absoluitely crucial to the protection of the staff and visitors, but also to ensure the safety of the collection of two million works of art for which we are the responsible stewards. I am sure you know that these works cover five millennia of human artistic achievement at the highest levels of creativity, and that they are the means of educating and enlightening our own and future generations about the many cultures represented here. As a practical matter, much of the collection is in storage, and any rodent infestation poses a severe danger to works on canvas, paper, or made of textile, wood, or other organic material. Such damage would be irreversible It is our irrevocable responsibility to safeguard the works for all future time.



If this is what the back of the MET looks like, can you imagine what the basement looks like? This garbage pile is placed here every day as a little depot for pickup at the end of the day. This is on the East Drive between Cleopatra's Needle and the SW corner of the MET. Can you imagine what the garbage area out of the public's eye looks like inside the MET? This is food for rats and even if they remove the 'food' at the end of the day...



They always leave the 'gravy' behind!


That said, we are cognizant of and sympathetic to the concerns of environmentalists who care deeply about the natural order, and we acted immediately when alerted that unusually virulent chemicals were being employed by a contractor to bait rodent traps outside the perimeter of our building. The chemicals were changed to the same formulas used in rodent traps throughout the city’s parks, and widely recognized by experts as posing little damage to predators of rats because the material is slow-acting: by the time it kills the rodent, the chemicals have sufficiently dissipated so as to pose no threat to those who feed on it.


Please be assured that we continue to monitor these baiting stations and closely observe the situation. We are pledged to working as sensitively as possible to balance our responsibilities to the millions of people who work and visit the Met, together with the works of art they care for or come to see, as well as the beautiful park we have been privileged to occupy for more than a century.


Many thanks for your continued interest.


Harold Holzer
Senior Vice President, External Affairs
The Metropolitan Museum of Art
1000 Fifth Avenue
New York, NY 10028


T: 212-570-3951
F: 212-472-2764
Email: harold.holzer@metmuseum.org


******************************************************


The Metropolitan Museum of Art is deceiving the public on the lethal rodenticide they are using! After issuing that sterile 'News Release' on July 15, 2008 in which they pretended to be so remorseful about the lethal poison (FASTRAC, active ingredient 'Bromethalin') which was being used 'without their knowledge', they have now reverted to CONTRAC (active ingredient Bromodiolone) which is just as bad as the poison that they were so sorry to have been using.
Keep calling and writing the MET's director Philippe de Montebello:(212) 570-3902!
email: philippe.demontebello@metmuseum.org

Do not call the Communications Department which they keep referring callers to. They are just diverting the attention of this important situation. Let the director himself get the heat and let him know that he must step in and end this horrible practice. This is New York City where all the world's most technically and morally advanced people are supposedly living. Rats are not living in the park or in the museum to eat grass and nibble on milkweed they are coming to eat hamburgers and hot dogs and French fries and all the other gluttonous human food which is poorly disposed and managed at the MET and in Central Park.
I will not just stand by and take 'pretty' pictures of these animals and not speak out for them!
What kind of society will continuously and willfully endanger the life of its precious wildlife especially in these enlightened times? The MET and Central Park must stop their careless attitude toward these weaker and vulnerable creatures. They must step down from their phony pedestal and learn to live with all our animals. The Earth will be quite habitable without phony art exhibits and fickle human beings that fuss over them, but it will be a sorry place to live without red-tailed hawks and rats.




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News Release
The Metropolitan Museum of Art
Communications Department
1000 Fifth Avenue,
New York, NY 10028-0198
tel (212) 570-3951
fax (212) 472-2764
communications@metmuseum.org


Conntact:
Harold Holzer


STATEMENT BY THE METROPOLITAN MUSEUM OF ART


(July 15, 2008)—The Metropolitan Museum recently learned that, without its knowledge, its pest-control contractors apparently used an unapproved chemical deterrent around the building’s exterior to address an infestation. In response, the Museum instructed the contractor to remove the deterrent and substitute the more appropriate, widely used product that had been previously employed. This has been accomplished. The Metropolitan regrets that this situation was allowed to exist undetected, and thanks the alert citizens who brought it to its attention. As a longtime, grateful “resident” of Central Park, the Museum remains committed to balancing its responsibility to protect its building, employees, visitors, and collections, with its obligation to respect the natural environment outside.


******************************************************


The MET is using rodent baiting stations containing the lethal active ingredient 'Bromethalin'. These stations are placed in open areas behind the MET in Central Park specifically where Palemale & Lola catches a great deal of rats!
The Metropolitan Museum of Art has a very careless attitude toward animals;
Their lavish glass windows kills hundreds of migrating birds each year. Recently the glass in those windows were replaced but nothing was done to the new glass to help prevent this ongoing tragedy.
All around the MET are rodent baiting stations which threaten the lives of our precious wildlife especially Palemale & Lola. Both the MET's management and their private pest control contractor has lied to me about the seriousness of the poison used in these bait stations. Presently the bait used is worse than the anti-coagulants used previously. Please call the Director's Office and tell them to stop endangering the lives of our precious wildlife!


The Metropolitan Museum of Art
Philippe de Montebello (Director)
(212) 570-3902
email: philippe.demontebello@metmuseum.org



The Metropolitan Museum of Art
Emily Rafferty (President)
(212) 570-3900

email: emily.rafferty@metmuseum.org





On Sunday July 22, 2007 I observed a baiting station in front of the MET at approx 83rd St & Fifth Ave. I noted the information on the top of the box: [Orkin Pest Control, Protecta LP, Bell Rodent Bait Station].

I contacted James Green at Orkin Pest Control who informed me that the box which I observed does not contain any poison but rather has a non-toxic non-anticoagulant material used only for ‘monitoring the presence of rodents’. When I asked him to explain how this material works he said: “The rodent goes into the box and eats the material. The box is examined periodically to check for activity.” I asked James Green if this is similar to placing a piece of bread in the box and then later checking to see if it has bite marks. James Green laughed and said “something like that but much more involved”. James told me the name of the material in the box is called ‘Fastrac’. He confirmed to me that ‘Fastrac’ is non-anticoagulant and non-toxic.

After speaking to James Green from Orkin Pest Control I visited the Bell Labs website and discovered that Fastrac contrary to the information divulged by Mr. Green is indeed an anti-coagulant and a toxic rodenticide.
(July 16, 2008: Correction; Fastrac is not an anti-coagulant but rather a different type of poison which targets the nervous system "A newer type of active ingredient is bromethalin, which is a neurotoxin that may cause an accumulation of fluid in the brain and spinal cord. Some of the signs of bromethalin poisoning are incoordination, hyper excitability, tremors, seizures, depression, hide leg weakness, and death. Its us should be monitored closely."


Seeing that I received incorrect information from Orkin I decided to open the box and see for myself what was inside. I discovered that the actual material inside the box is called ‘CONTRAC’.

“CONTRAC, a single-feeding anticoagulant bait containing Bromadiolone, is excellent for controlling mice and rats, including warfarin-resistant Norway rats. It is ideal to use as a clean-out and maintenance bait. - Bell Labs

“The three highly toxic pesticides that will no longer be available over the counter are brodifacoum, bromodiolone, and difethialone, which have the greatest potential for poisoning wild birds and scavenging mammals as a result of eating poisoned rodents. These will become "restricted use only" and will be available only to certified pest control operators.”



July 2008 - This is a new rodenticide 'FASTRAC' which the MET is using in baiting stations carelessly placed all around the perimeter of the museum in Central Park...



You can see dogs and wildlife have easy access to the baiting stations and with little effort, the contents of these stations.



Here are some links to FASTRAC:
From Wikipedia on Bromethalin




The Metropolitan Museum of Art
Philippe de Montebello (Director)
(212) 570-3902
email: philippe.demontebello@metmuseum.org



The Metropolitan Museum of Art
Emily Rafferty (President)
(212) 570-3900

email: emily.rafferty@metmuseum.org





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